Language Arts

Dear Parents and Students,

Reading is not only a life-long skill that a person needs to succeed as a student and a worker, but also an
essential skill in civic and personal activities. Perhaps even more importantly, reading opens the world to
a person through various forms of literature. Reading gives students the opportunity to learn about people,
times, regions, and ideas that may enhance their knowledge and development. Reading also can bring a
lifetime of pleasure. English 11/12 CP, Honor’s, and AP Language and Composition courses demand
rigorous reading of non-fiction and fiction. All books selected are chosen based on merit and suggested
readings promoted by AP Central.

Research strongly suggests that reading, like most skills, improves with practice and decreases when we
neglect it for even a short time. Therefore, consistent with our commitment to prepare all students for
success during school and after graduation, WHS continues to expect all students to read during the
summer.

In keeping with the belief that reading promotes students’ mental growth, improves their capacity to
process information, and enhances their ability to understand themselves and the world around them,
students at Williamsburg will read, and respond—in writing—to the texts they read. Successful
completion of the summer reading assignment will benefit your child as he or she progresses through our
curriculum. We owe it to our students to prepare them for an increasingly competitive and complex
world.

Sincerely,
Mark Isaac

ENG11 CP, HONORS ENG 11,ENG 12 CP, AP LANG&COMP SUMMER READING 2014 2

 

English 11 CP/ Honor’s 11/ English 12 CP/AP Language and Composition

Reading Journal each quarter and summer reading-We no longer have a library in the

school, some books may have to be purchased.

 

Please understand and remember that this is a critical reading journal, not a personal

response. This journal is designed to help you develop critical thinking and reading skills so

that you can both develop and articulate legitimate readings of a text. An example is

attached at the end of this document. Using reading journals, I hope, will make your reading

and learning personal. And as you attend carefully to how you read and to what you personally

make of your reading, I believe you will be surprised to find that such things can improve your

enthusiasm for reading and your participation in the classroom. By watching your own reading

move from puzzlements through approximations and misreadings to more and more satisfying

readings you will gradually develop a more realistic sense of what valid and legitimate readings

of text are, and in class discussion more readily share your readings and build on each other’s

perceptions instead of worrying about who is right and who is wrong.

 

You need a separate binder (3 hole) just for this journal. It is essential that you as you read, you

work within your journal. When reading a full-length book take notes on a regular basis and

indicate page numbers as you take notes. You also will be required at times to take journal notes

during class. Divide your notes on the page right side (as you read notes (events)) left side (and

analysis, assessments of your reading (what it means)). Keep the difference clear and make use

of it. Cite page numbers. Also cite the text you are reading.

 

What to put on the right hand sides:

1. Times when your reading changes:

You see something you didn’t see before

You recognize a pattern—the images start to overlap, gestures or phrase recur, some

details seem associated with each other.

The story suddenly seems to you to be about something different from what you thought.

You discover you were misreading.

The writer introduces a new context or new perspective.

 

ENG11 CP, HONORS ENG 11,ENG 12 CP, AP LANG&COMP SUMMER READING 2014 3

 

2. Times when you are surprised or puzzled:

Something just doesn’t fit

Things don’t make sense—pose explicitly the question or problem that occurs to you.

3. Details that seem important and make you look again

4. Ways in which the story makes you speculate about real life or a connection to another

text or even another academic discipline.

5. Your first impression of the ending—what “ended’?

6. Rhetorical devices that you notice—how do they contribute to your reading of the text.

7. Cite page numbers
This list is designed only to get you started. Once you get comfortable with the process, you will

find that you will make the list that you need.
When writing in the journal, use full sentences instead of phrase. The demands of the sentence

will help you draw out your thoughts fully. Be explicit about the nature of your change or

surprise or puzzlement—what caused it in the text? The journal will seem less of an intrusion in

your reading if you follow the natural rhythms of reading, Sometimes we are carried along by the

flow of the story.
But the things I’ve asked you to note are all signs that it’s time to pause and reflect. What piece

of literature is designed to be read straight through at uniform speed? Only machines work that

way. The reading journal is a device to help you make more of those moments of reflection and

to preserve then for later reflection.
You will draw on your journal entries regularly in class discussion, and in turn you will work out

in your journals new issues that will come up in class. Sometimes I will ask you to share your

journal with the entire class. You will share your journal in writing groups. Obviously you can

use others ideas, that is what comes out of discussion.
While in writing groups I expect you to add to your journal. You will find that some have insight

that you didn’t or offer an answer to a question.

 

ENG11 CP, HONORS ENG 11,ENG 12 CP, AP LANG&COMP SUMMER READING 2014 4

 

What to put on the left side of the paper
When you finish a story, go back and use the left-hand sides of the pages to comment on your

original observations and make something of them. Is there a pattern to the changes you

experienced? Does the ending tie them together? Why did you misread when you did? Then,

reflect on yourself as a reader—What do you focus on? What do you care most about? What do

you disregard? Where do you strain to follow the story sympathetically? What did you miss?

What did you get? Finally, as you make these reflections on your reading experience, discuss

your emerging sense of how the story works and what it’s about. Please note the three step

process.

 

Conferences : Presenting the Reading Journal – Honors 11 and AP will conference over

text

As you know, your work in the journal will count as a mandatory conference time with me as

well as an additional 100pts. for content (this grade will be determined by how well you present

to me in our conference). Your fundamental task is to demonstrate your growth as a reader. You

will want to prepare by reviewing the journal, selecting especially significant parts to read to me,

summarizing and interpreting your work so as to show me what you made of the text for

yourself. Basically you are guiding a conversation with me. As in any conversation, you should

be prepared for my asking you questions and making comments.

 

Our focus at this critical stage with the journal is not some ideal reading but your own process of

making meaning. The conference will allow us to zero in quickly on the major successes you’ve

had as well as the problems. What begins in the journal as a kind of personal dialectic through

the use of opposing sides of the pages, becomes a conference in actual dialogue. You will come

to see the complete continuity between personal work in the journal and public exchange about

readings. We’ll take this step by step. Each journal will be due by the 2nd

should be between 15-20 pages for each text read. Please use three ring binder.

 

day of school. Journals

ENG11 CP, HONORS ENG 11,ENG 12 CP, AP LANG&COMP SUMMER READING 2014 5
Summer reading list **AP Language and Composition students only

1. AP must choose two non-fiction texts(room 210 only).

1984 / The Grapes of Wrath/Native Son are the fiction options Total 3 text

100 Great Essays work sheet 5 essays(see worksheet page 7)

AP will write 20 one pagers 5 on text-5 on current event-10 open

2. Honor’s 11 must choose one nonfiction text and one fiction text 20+ pages of novel notes

for each text

3. English 12 CP must choose two texts

Eng 12 will write 10 one pagers- 5 on text- 5 open

4. English 11 CP must choose one text 20 + pages of novel notes

 Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

 Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift

 The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck**

 1984 by George Orwell**

 Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes

 Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

 Native Son by Richard Wright**

 On the Road by Jack Kerouac

 The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson**(nonfiction)

 What we talk about when we talk about love by Raymond Carver

 A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers ** (nonfiction)

 A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J.Gaines

 Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo

 Cat’s cradle; God bless you, Mr. Rosewater; Slaughter House Five by Kurt Vonnegut

 A Man Without a Country by Kurt Vonnegut** (nonfiction)

 Slouching towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion** (nonfiction)

 You can’t be neutral on a moving train: a personal history of our times by Howard Zinn**

(nonfiction)

ENG11 CP, HONORS ENG 11,ENG 12 CP, AP LANG&COMP SUMMER READING 2014 6

 

 Freakonomics: a rogue economist explores the hidden side of everything by Steven

D.Levitt (nonfiction)

 Superfreakonomics see above (nonfiction)

 One flew Over the Cuckoo’s nest by Ken Kesey

 A Prayer For Owen Meany by John Irving

 Armageddon in Retrospect by Kurt Vonnegut** (nonfiction)

 Silent Spring by Rachel Carson** (nonfiction)

 Eli the Good by Silas House

 The way of ignorance: and other essays by Wendell Berry** (nonfiction)

 As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

 Into Thin Air; Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer (nonfiction)

 

ENG11 CP, HONORS ENG 11,ENG 12 CP, AP LANG&COMP SUMMER READING 2014 7

 

**Persuasive Essay Analysis 100 great essays AP

Identify the text

Author/title

Page numbers

What is the issue/argument?

How did the writer (author) present their argument? (What kinds of persuasive strategies,

appeals and language did they use to present the argument?)

What is the author’s purpose? How do they accomplish the purpose(s)?

Who is the intended audience?

How effective were they in persuading their intended audience?

Favorite quote

What is the significance of the title?

 

Style in writing is simply how the voice of the writer comes out on the page. What style did the

author write in? Why did they choose this style?

 

Tone is implied through style. Tone is the feeling the reader obtains as they read and what they

are left thinking when they finish reading the essay. What tone (mood) where they trying to get

the reader to feel from reading.

 

What significant supporting detail did they include in their essay? What supporting detail had to

be in the essay for it to work? Why did they choose one detail over another?

 

Why would unity and organization be important in a published essay? Do you feel the writer

accomplished this through their writing process? Explain

 

Idea- simply put do you feel the rhetoric made the reader think or envision a new idea? Did the

writer teach the reader anything (offer insight)? Were they original in approach? Explain

 

Mr. Isaac: English 11CP; Honor’s 11; English 12 CP; AP Language and Composition (12)

isaac_m@burgschools.org

ENG11 CP, HONORS ENG 11,ENG 12 CP, AP LANG&COMP SUMMER READING 2014 8